I’ve been looking for an opportunity to get my overwintering Onion sets in. No luck, it’s a quagmire out there.

I don’t usually do overwintering Onions. I normally put them in around end of Feb/March depending on the weather. But I’ve decided that I’ll be so bored over the Winter that I need something to keep me going! I’m attempting Peas and Broadbeans too.

It’s looking hopeful for tomorrow. Maybe I’ll get some other things done from my ‘rain-challenged’ list of things to do in November.

Anyone else overwintering? Whatcha growing?

20 Responses to “Overwintering Onion Sets Still in Bag”

  1. Broken Chalkon 10 Nov 2009 at 10:31 pm

    I’ve got garlic and broad beans in. I’ve not dared try peas. Well, to be honest, I didn’t realise you could do peas. My two references at the moment are the Readers’ Digest Massive Book Of What You Can Grow And How To Cook It (I’ve paraphrased the title because it’s in the garden shed and I can’t be bothered to go out in the dark and rain with a torch to look) and that John Seymour book about Self-Sufficiency.

    Both of them, although aimed at the beginner, fail to understand how much of a beginner I am. John, in particular, makes throwaway comments about stuff like ‘picking the tips out of broad beans’ which to him makes perfect sense but, to me, means hours of wondering how far a tip extends down and whether it’ll kill the plant if I take too much.

    Ah, this world… so complicated. I’m still amazed every time I plant a seed and something green actually shoots up.

  2. 2AcreFarmon 11 Nov 2009 at 12:08 am

    I planted five pounds of garlic this fall and I am going to be trying spinach and lettuce in my new mini greenhouses. Good luck with your onions. I am going to be starting onions from seed this winter for the first time. Have you ever tried them from seed?

    -Nathan

  3. Joannaon 11 Nov 2009 at 9:53 am

    Hi … I’m overwintering peas and broad beans, which I’ve never done before. The beans, I think, should be fine, whatever the weather throws at them – they’re quite close to the house, so even if we have a week of big frosts, they shouldn’t bear the brunt of it and all will be well. But the peas … are you going to fleece yours? Or leave them to take their chances? I just can’t decide, and am afraid that indecision will be the death of them ;)

    Would love to know your thoughts

    Joanna

  4. mtpon 11 Nov 2009 at 10:04 am

    2AcreFarm – nope never done them from seed. I haven’t got a greenhouse and so I’ve always wimped out!

  5. mtpon 11 Nov 2009 at 10:05 am

    Joanna, yes when I plant the peas I will probably try to offer some kind of cover – although how long it will stay on I don’t know!

  6. mtpon 11 Nov 2009 at 10:06 am

    Hi Broken Chalk,

    I know what you mean about having so many questions – I still do! Regarding the Broadbeans you should take about this much. http://www.mytinyplot.co.uk/pests/why-pinch-out-broadbean-tips/

    Just the bunched up bit at the top.
    Hope that helps.

  7. Suzonon 11 Nov 2009 at 10:21 am

    I’ve wanted to start sweet peas and I do have a mini-cold frame to keep them in, but do you just let them be or do you need to keep them watered?

    Thanks for bringing up the topic of over-wintering as many of us are rank beginners!

  8. sara butleron 11 Nov 2009 at 11:23 am

    Ive got garlic, broad beans and onions in on what was a clay soil that I have improved. Just hoping they do ok, not overwintered before but didnt want to finish the garden just because its winter.

  9. Debbieon 11 Nov 2009 at 1:25 pm

    My broad bean seeds have been on the plot since the end of October and are coming on well (hope that doesn’t tempt fate) and I am following Mr Middleton’s (Dig for Victory 1942) advice and doing peas in the cold frame on the first floor balcony of my flat. I was worried that they were romping away in the mild weather so I have pinched out the tops, like you do with sweet peas, in the hope that they will produce more root and branch out. I have no idea what made me think of it, I just hope it works.

  10. Amandaon 11 Nov 2009 at 2:55 pm

    I have onions in and I checked them this morning after receiving your email and they have started to grow! I also have perpetual spinach, spring onions and celeriac and my leeks are ready now and much better than last years attempt :-)

  11. nic @ nipitinthebudon 11 Nov 2009 at 5:52 pm

    I wasn’t going to do onions and was digging over the ground to sow more green manure. I couldn’t help myself though when I saw how crumbly the soil was so dashed off to the garden centre to get some onions. They went in a couple of weeks ago and the broad beans went in on Monday. Never been this organised before so quite excited to see how they fare (and have spare beans for a Feb sowing if they don’t make it through the winter).

  12. Thursdayon 11 Nov 2009 at 6:01 pm

    Garlic, onions and shallots. Put them in about 4 weeks ago and they’re already growing which seems far, far quicker than last year. Tried doing broad beans over winter last year – total failure which I think was due to where I put them which wasn’t getting as much of the available sun as they could.

  13. Andy Davieson 11 Nov 2009 at 9:51 pm

    Peas and beans are in and the shoots are above ground and under fleece.

    Shallots and garlic are waiting to go it

    The beetroot is in but looks a little small so not sure if they’ll survive – managed to overwinter beetroot and spring onions last winter but it was more by accident than design

    Andy

  14. Steelon 12 Nov 2009 at 10:26 am

    I’m having a go at some mange tout, a few leftover onion sets I found still alive in the shed, a few baby carrots, turnips, a bit of kale and some lettuce.

    That’s if I can outwit the chickens….

  15. Joon 12 Nov 2009 at 10:37 am

    I’m not leaving anything in the ground over winter. I only got my allotment this year and the soil is in a bit of a state, so I have opted to get everywhere covered with manure instead this year, hoping to get some goodness back into the soil. It will be a different story next year though, I’m going to have a go at overwintering a few things.

  16. Natalieon 14 Nov 2009 at 10:50 am

    I have just ordered some purple garlic from The Garlic Farm. It is the first thing that I have grown over the winter.

    I would like to try some broad beans or peas but I am a bit unsure where to start. Any help would be brilliant.

    Due to major re-organisation of the garden, I have only got a bit of space that is ready for growing in at the moment!

  17. Stephanie K.on 14 Nov 2009 at 1:09 pm

    Planted red barron onion sets five weeks ago and they have started to come through.
    Planted some more just over a week ago to try and stagger crop, but am looking forward to eating them next year. Red onions are my favourite, with cheese in a sandwich!

    Not sure quite, when they will be ready. Does any one know?

    Thanks.

  18. Zoeon 15 Nov 2009 at 6:17 pm

    I’ve got broccoli and spinach in so far, and some garlic I saved from this year’s harvest still to go in. I’m not sure where I’m going to put the garlic as there’s not much space left – I think I need a bigger garden!!

  19. Debbieon 16 Nov 2009 at 12:35 pm

    Natalie, there are several items about broad beans and peas from mtp on this very site, so you’re in luck if you’re looking for good advice. The things about overwintering broad beans and peas is to get the right ones. They will say which are recommended on the packets. I am doing “Aquadulce Claudia” and “Early Onward” respectively, as they are tried and tested varieties. Good luck.

  20. Roberton 27 Nov 2009 at 11:35 am

    What is the latest that overwintering onions can be planted?